Back to Program Overview

Breakout Sessions

Field Trips, Tutorials, Workshops

 

Breakout sessions are scheduled on Tuesday morning and afternoon and on Friday morning. These small group sessions are opportunities for participants to connect across disciplines. The hands-on workshops, tutorials and field trips will be a chance for color scientists to talk to artists, artists to talk to representatives from the color industries, and industrialists to talk with scientists.

Breakout sessions are optional additions to the Symposium. Participants will be able to sign up for the breakout sessions when they register for the Symposium.

  Media Lab  Massachusetts Institute of Technology  

Media Lab
Massachusetts Institute of Technology
 

Tuesday, June 12 - Breakout Session Half-Day Field Trip

Exhibits at the MIT Media Lab

The MIT Media Lab was founded by MIT Professor Nicholas Negroponte and the late Jerome Wiesner (former science advisor to president John F. Kennedy and former president of MIT), who foresaw the coming convergence of computing, publishing, and broadcast, fueled by changes in the communications industry.  True to the vision of its founders, today's Media Lab continues to focus on the study, invention, and creative use of digital technologies to enhance the ways that people think, express, and communicate ideas, and explore new scientific frontiers.

"Media means ways to communicate, and the Media Lab is about communication among disciplines." 

  The Beautiful Brain: The Drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal   MIT Museum  Massachusetts Institute of Technology

The Beautiful Brain: The Drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal

MIT Museum
Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Tuesday, June 12 - Breakout Session Half-Day Field Trip

The Beautiful Brain: The Drawings of Santiago Ramón y Cajal

An unprecedented opportunity to see and compare the beautifully rendered images of renowned scientist Santiago Ramón y Cajal (1852-1934), with contemporary visualizations of the brain created by neuroscientists at MIT and other universities.

Tour Guide: Mark Fairchild

  Forbes Pigment Collection    Fogg Art Museum Harvard University

Forbes Pigment Collection

 Fogg Art Museum
Harvard University

Tuesday, June 12 - Breakout Session Half-Day Field Trip

The Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies at Harvard University

The Straus Center for Conservation and Technical Studies at Harvard's Fogg Art Museum is a world leader in fine arts conservation, research, and training. The center’s laboratories are where conservation, conservation science, and curatorial practice intersect, coming together to enrich the understanding of and care for the approximately 250,000 objects in the Harvard Art Museums’ collections

The visit will include a presentation by a conversation coordinator on the work of the lab from the viewing windows in the LightBox Gallery as well as a special tour of the Forbes Pigment Collection for a limited number of attendees.  

  Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments   Science Center Putnam Gallery Harvard University  

Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments

Science Center Putnam Gallery
Harvard University
 

Tuesday, June 12 - Breakout Session Half-Day Field Trip

Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments
Harvard University

Harvard has acquired scientific instruments on a continuous basis for teaching and research since 1672.  In 2006, Harvard’s Collection of Historical Scientific Instruments relocated from its hiding place in the basement of the Science Center to the main floor of the Putnam Gallery.  

The highlight of this field trip will be a special seminar presented by the collection staff to examine instruments related to color analysis and vision.  These will include Edwin H. Land’s laboratory apparatus, early Munsell color globes and related instruments from the experimental psychology laboratory of Hugo Munsterberg (circa 1890s-1910s.)

  Boston Museum of Fine Arts   

Boston Museum of Fine Arts
 

Tuesday, June 12 - Breakout Session Half-Day Field Trip

Tour of the Boston Museum of Fine Arts (MFA)

The original MFA opened its doors to the public on July 4, 1876, the nation’s centennial. Built in Copley Square, the MFA was then home to 5,600 works of art. Over the next several years, the collection and number of visitors grew exponentially, and in 1909 the Museum moved to its current home on Huntington Avenue.

Today the MFA is one of the most comprehensive art museums in the world; the collection encompasses nearly 500,000 works of art. The museum welcomes more than one million visitors each year to experience art from ancient Egyptian to contemporary, special exhibitions, and innovative educational programs.

Tour Guide: Graydon Parrish

  Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum   

Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum
 

Tuesday, June 12 - Breakout Session Half-Day Field Trip

Tour of the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum

The Gardner museum houses world-class paintings collected by Gardner during her lifetime. The Venetian inspired building, established as Fenway Court when it opened in 1903, today hosts Gardner's original artwork as well as other art exhibitions and community events. 

The 'infamous 1990 theft of priceless paintings stands as the largest art heist in history, according to the museum.

Tour Guide: Graydon Parrish

  Colors of Babel  Dimitris Mylonas

Colors of Babel
Dimitris Mylonas

Friday, June 15 - Breakout Session Ninety Minute Tutorial

Colours of Babel

Play the game! The Colours of Babel deck of cards is designed to reveal the misunderstanding involved in colour language. The colours are carefully selected by analysing the responses from the online experiment to provide a staircase game experience with easy to difficult to name colour cards.

  Seeing Color  Paul Green-Armytage

Seeing Color
Paul Green-Armytage

Tuesday, June 12 - Breakout Session Three Hour Workshop

Seeing Color  

This workshop might be called ‘Art for non-artists’ except that we hope some artists will also take part. The workshop has two main aims. The first aim is the same as that professed by Josef Albers when he arrived to teach at Black Mountain College in 1933: it is “to make open the eyes”. Albers wanted his students to learn, first, how to see. Participants in this workshop will be looking closely to see subtle colour relationships and will try to capture the colour character of a flower or a painting. The second aim is to open up new ways of generating colour combinations for possible application in such fields as textiles and interior design.

We will explore the possibilities of chance that emerge while playing my classroom version of The Colour Card Game and will follow the kind of advice once given to students by an eminent graphic designer: “When in doubt, rip off Matisse”. Participants will work with coloured paper to produce simple designs in a standard format. The standard format will make it easier to focus on colour relationships and on how the dimensions of hue, value, and chroma contribute to the overall effect of a design. Very little skill will be required and all materials will be provided. Participants will leave with their own examples of ‘Instant Art’.

  Color Image Scale  Setsuku Horiguchi

Color Image Scale
Setsuku Horiguchi

Psychological Analysis with Color Image Scale

Tuesday, June 12th - Breakout Session Three-Hour Workshop
and Friday, June 15th

Color Image Scale, developed by Nippon Color Design Research Institute (NCD) and its founder Shigenobu Kobayashi (1925-2010), is a revolutionary 3D modeling system for psychological color space with Warm-Cool, Soft-Hard, and Clear-Grayish axes. Based on decades of research, it depicts the psychological effect of color combinations using the least number of index colors possible. The research, based on Munsell Color System and started in the early 1970’s, was initially focused on individual colors, but gradually shifted its attention towards the psychological impact and pragmatic use of color. By incorporating the semantics and human perception to the traditional color anatomy, the final product offers a cultural and societal understanding of color that serves a wide variety of commercial and educational purposes.

Although based primarily on adjectives culled from the Japanese language, Color Image Scale is highly adaptable for cross-cultural comparative study of color design. In the workshop, we will offer a systematic view of the semantics of color, and outline the color-based structure of people’s relationship to their culture and environment. After creating 3-color combinations using 130 color samples (10 Hues x 12 Tones, plus 10 Neutrals) to match certain adjectival themes, the participants will work in groups to analyze the results according to Color Image Scale. Through this exercise exposing the audience to the vast possibility of color combinations, and through the following discussion, the workshop will offer new insights into the semantics of color.

  Natural Colour System  Berit Bergström

Natural Colour System
Berit Bergström

Thursday, June 14 - Breakout Session Three-Hour Workshop

Introduction to the Natural Colour System

“Choosing colours should not be a gamble.
It should be a conscious decision.
Colours have meaning and function. ”
     Verner Panton from his book “Notes on Colour”
 

Colour is what we see, a subjective visual sensation. To characterize a colour you therefore have to describe what you see. It is not enough to identify a colour with pigments and their mixtures or with wavelengths and physical stimuli. How the colour is mixed, as well as the measurement data, is necessary for production, but to communicate with the customer you need a system in the way people see colours. NCS, the Natural Colour System®© is a logical colour system which builds on how the human being sees colour. The NCS notation gives you an unambiguous definition of a colour and any surface colour can be described. It can facilitate your colour specification, documentation and colour design. It is simple to decide and combine choices of colour with the help of NCS system.

A colour system does not necessarily give pretty colour combinations, but it does provide a tool for experimenting with different colour harmonies. You can develop your colour concept by observing what the colours look like and how they relate visually to each other. We will work hands-on with various colour exercises which will develop your capability and sensibility of seeing colour.

  Albers' Color Studies  Lois Swirnoff

Albers' Color Studies
Lois Swirnoff

Tuesday, June 12 - Breakout Session Three Hour Workshop

Albers' Color Studies  

Explore the color exercises of Albers' classic Interactions of Color.

  Color Systems  Mark Fairchild

Color Systems
Mark Fairchild

Tuesday, June 12 - Breakout Session Tutorial

Color Appearance, Color Order, & Other
Color Systems

How do color systems work? How do they vary? Are Munsell and Pantone doing the same thing? This tutorial will examine the mathematical description of color appearance and then explore how appearance is encoded in color order systems such as the Munsell Book of Color, the Natural Color System, and the OSA-UCS. It will also explore the differences between color appearance systems such as these and other useful systems that are used to name, specify, and communicate colors. We will end with a short update on recent progress in the understanding of human color vision for color appearance specification.

  Archive Your Own Artwork  Roy Berns

Archive Your Own Artwork
Roy Berns

Tuesday, June 12 - Breakout Session Tutorial

Archive Your Own Artwork Photographically

Many of today’s digital cameras have sufficient quality for use in artwork documentation. This tutorial will first review quality criteria including resolution, color accuracy, color encoding, bit depth, image noise, and sharpness. We will next consider how to photograph artwork that is repeatable and scientific. This includes adding reference targets into the frame. We will conclude with a demonstration of an easy-to-use color management system. Participants should have general knowledge about using a single lens reflex camera.

  An Approach to Teaching Color  Roy Osborne

An Approach to Teaching Color
Roy Osborne

Tuesday, June 12 - Breakout Session 90 Minute Tutorial

An Approach to Teaching Color

Roy Osborne’s presentation, illustrated with examples of students’ work, will examine his own various approaches to teaching color theory and practice in art, developed since he was first invited to teach BA modules in Color Theory at the University of Akron, Ohio (1986-87), and later developed at various college throughout England and elsewhere. The structure and content of the courses developed from the first draft of ‘Color Influencing Form’, written in 1984 but not published until 2004 (in an abridged edition). An underlying aim was not only to have students create ‘works of art’ for their portfolios, rather than mere color exercises, but to start to explore methodical relationships between color and form.

  Munsell Color Mixing  Graydon Parrish

Munsell Color Mixing
Graydon Parrish

Friday, June 15 -  Breakout Session Three-Hour Tutorial

Munsell Color Mixing 

A demonstration of color mixing in oil paints with reference to the Munsell system.

  Munsell Treasures  Greg Wallace

Munsell Treasures
Greg Wallace

Tuesday, June 11 - Breakout Session 90 minute Tutorial

MassArt Munsell Treasures

A show-and-tell demo. Experience firsthand antique Munsell devices, instructional toys, and memorabilia kept at the MassArt Library. You'll see a vintage color sphere that spins, an early version of the "color tree," a 1920s edition of Munsell's Atlas with still vibrant color chips, assorted whirligigs and Maxwell disks, as well as unpublished Munsell photos and documents.

  Create A Color Forecast  Leslie Harrington

Create A Color Forecast
Leslie Harrington

Tuesday, June 13 - Breakout Session Three Hour Workshop

Create a Color Forecast

Put yourself in the shoes of a color consultant and explore the process of creating a color forecast. Color forecasting is sometimes referred to as a self-fulfilling prophecy but analyzing trends is critical for businesses who must decide - sometimes years in advance - on the color of their products. The risks of getting it wrong are great, the returns on getting it right are even greater. 

  Dimensions of Color  David Briggs

Dimensions of Color
David Briggs

Tuesday, June 12 -  Breakout Session Three-Hour Workshop

Dimensions of Color for Artists

The conceptual framework for object colors of hue, lightness and absolute or relative chroma remains the predominant color model among artists. This preference is in part due to the central role assigned to the representationally and compositionally important attribute of lightness. Nevertheless, other attributes of perceived color including brightness, colorfulness, saturation and brilliance are also relevant to the color problems faced by artists.

Through a combination of lecture content, Illustrations, demonstrations, interactive activities and open discussion we will explore in this workshop how these attributes of perceived color can be communicated so that they can be better understood by art students and artists.

  Color Naming Experiment  Dimitris Mylonas

Color Naming Experiment
Dimitris Mylonas

Tuesday, June 11 - Breakout Session Ninety Minute Tutorial

The Color Naming Experiment

This is an update and exploration of the multi-lingual colour naming experiment hosted at the Department of Computer Science, University College London. The project is part of research on colour naming and colour categorisation within different cultures, and aims to improve the inter-cultural colour dialogue. By taking part you are helping us to develop an online colour naming model which will be based on the colour language provided from your responses